couponing in the holy land

Frugal food shopping for the Anglo Israeli

Archive for the tag “fish”

More meat and fish shortages expected next week- stock up now

Municipal veterinarians throughout the country are threatening to strike on October 26 in protest of a proposed new law that will transfer much of their authority to a תאגיד (corporation) that will perform veterinary inspection of food of animal origin under the authority of the Ministries of Health and Agriculture.

The main focus of their ire is the revoking of what is called בדיקת משנה- literally secondary examination- of meat, poultry, and fish when it passes from municipality to municipality.  The laws that require this examination were written 30 and 50 years ago and are not performed in any other developed country.  Detractors of this examination say that each municipality charges exorbitant fees, has very limited hours for inspection (generally not in tandem with delivery hours), and actually damages the products by exposing them to high temperatures when opening the truck for the exam.  Rescinding this part of the law will lower prices for the consumer and provide a higher quality product with a longer shelf life.  The “taagid”, under government authority and not privately owned, will inspect the food before it leaves the factory as well as when it arrives at its final destination- whether it is a supermarket, cold storage, or restaurant.

Proponents of “bedikat mishne” say that there won’t be enough inspectors to ensure the safety of food that is currently inspected by municipal veterinarians.  Prices won’t drop as expected and consumers will receive a lower-quality product.

This reform is part of the new Misrad HaBriut Food Law which passed the first reading in the Knesset and is being discussed prior to the second and third reading as part of חוק ההסדרים.  This law combines several laws into one and therefore the Food Law will be whisked along with other politically important legislation.  You can compare the hok to a VIP pass allowing fast access by avoiding all the lines.

I have strayed from the point of this post, which was to say that if the municipal veterinarians strike, they won’t be examining meat and fish that enters their municipality.  Since it must be inspected before it enters, there won’t be any meat or fish moved throughout the country starting on the 26th.  Food can be moved locally, however.  For example, if a shipment of frozen fish arrives by boat to the Ashdod port and is released to cold storage in Ashdod, all of the supermarkets in Ashdod can get fish delivered because it didn’t move between municipalities.  Chicken, however, is a different story.  Almost all of it moves between municipalities so expect a severe shortage.  What people may not realize is that stopping production not only hurts consumers, it also causes צער בעלי חיים- suffering to the animals.  Poultry has to be slaughtered by a certain age because if it is delayed, the birds will become too big for their house.  This will cause excessive crowding and undue stress on the birds.  It is not practical or financially feasible to move them to a larger house or split them up into two for that short time until they go to slaughter.  Therefore, whatever the outcome, it must be decided quickly because there will be a lot of pressure on Misrad haChaklaut to prevent those birds any undue suffering.

Source: Globes, Agrisupport online

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Kolbotek is justified in court: There really is a lot of water in frozen fish

In 2010, Kolbotek, the show that loves to expose secrets in the food industry, had a two-part show about the amount of water that is added and/or injected into frozen fish in Israel.  You can watch the videos here:

Quite a furor arose after this show- the Knesset called an emergency meeting to discuss the issue, supermarkets ran to remove the products from their freezers, and there were public campaigns to stop buying fish from China.  One of the companies, DeliDag, which is owned by Neto (think Tibon Veal, Atara, Wiliger, and more) sued Kolbotek for “lashon hara”-libel.  The judgement came down last week and DeliDag lost.

One of the judges had this to say about the suit:

Not every threat that publishes a study shows damage to the consumer.  The medicine for this is running to court and filing a libel suit.  Sometimes it is better to bow your head, examine the results of the study, to recognize the fault if there is one, and work to correct it.

So as sensationalist as Kolbotek tends to be, this time you can accept them as truth.  When you buy frozen fish, know that when it says “meubad”- “מעובד”- that means that the fish is processed and not fresh.  Look at the ingredients on the back and you will find food additives such as phosphates listed.  Food additives all have their E number listed with either the name or the type of food additive it is.  If you see that the fish has “tzipui kerach”-“ציפוי קרח”- that fished is glazed.  The law states that there can be up to 20% glazing on a fish.

Misrad HaBriut is responsible for the import of frozen and fresh fish to Israel.  If you find a product on the shelf that is not labeled appropriately or appears to have too much water in it, save the fish and the package and call *5400 or email Misrad HaBriut on their web site (English) to find out where to file a complaint.

Source: TheMarker

2 RECALLS: “HaTikvah” and “Yisragal” fish products

The pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes has been found in the fish products of two companies with factories in the Ashkelon district- “HaTikvah Smoked Fish” and “Yisragal Meterman”.  The specific products include:

HaTikvah:

  1. Fillet Matias in Oil- 480 grams (380 grams drained weight)- expiration dates 6 April 2015 and 9 April 2015
  2. Palamida in Oil- 480 grams (380 grams drained weight)- expiration date 9 April 2015

Yisragal:

  1. Herring Fillet- manufacturing date 18 Jan 2015, expiration date 5 March 2015

If you have purchased any of these products, do not consume them.  Bring them back to the place you purchased them to receive a refund.  Both of these companies are removing these products from the shelves.

Listeriosis, a serious infection usually caused by eating food contaminated with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, is an important public health problem. The disease primarily affects older adults, pregnant women, newborns, and adults with weakened immune systems. However, rarely, persons without these risk factors can also be affected. The risk may be reduced by recommendations for safe food preparation, consumption, and storage.  For more information, go to the CDC web site.

Source: Misrad HaBriut- HaTikva and Yisragal

Kimat Chinam’s weekly sale circular

Click here to see the circular.

Some good sales include Heinz 907 gram ketchup for 8.99 (credi card hoders only), apples/bananas/rimonim for 4.99/kg, Tirosh grape juice (750ml) for 7.99 each when you buy two, various frozen fish for 14.99/kg, and frozen meat between 19.99-24.99/kg.

Fish sale at Mega this week- August 2-10

All of the Mega stores are having a fish sale this week.

The fine print does say to expect different prices in the different branches, though.

For YOU members:

Fresh Tilapia/Amnon fillet for 29.99 shekels/kg when you spend at least 75 shekels on non-sale items.

Fresh Sterling Salmon for 57.99 shekels/kg when you spend at least 75 shekels on non-sale items.

For everybody else:

Fresh Merloza (Bakala Tza’ir, or Hake) in 1 kg packages for 15.99 shekels.

Delidag Frozen Bakala Tza’ir for 12.99 shekels/kg.

Delidag Frozen Nesichat HaNilus (Nile Perch) for 29.99 shekels/kg.

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